Baker's Guild

Directed bakers to make a common weight of bread known as a penny loaf. However, the loaf could vary in weight, and thus price, according to the type of flour used: the white loaf was made from the finest white flour available; the “wheaten” loaf was coarser, and weighed half again as much; “household” loaves were approximately double white loaves, made from unbolted flour “as it cometh from the mill.” This sounds fairly clear, but bread weights were inconsistently based on the going local rate of grain, and weights differed throughout the country.One of the most common ways to ensure that only authorized bakers sold bread was the use of a baker’s mark. Marks were registered with the local authorities and were made from wood or metal. The marks appear to be dies that stamped the underside of bread before cooking. In this manner the maker could be identified if the loaf was underweight or of inferior flour; in addition, bread sold without its mark levied heavy fines. (Innkeepers were the most common culprits.)

Baker's Guild

the Land of Bhalzinger... MrNummi